facebook and political media

It's amazing how far Facebook has come since the 2008 election: from a grassroots organizing, novelty poll generating curiosity to a dominant pillar in shaping the national political conversation.

This year, political content has become more popular all across the platform: on homegrown Facebook pages, through media companies with a growing Facebook presence and through the sharing habits of users in general. But truly Facebook-native political pages have begun to create and refine a new approach to political news: cherry-picking and reconstituting the most effective tactics and tropes from activism, advocacy and journalism into a potent new mixture. This strange new class of media organization slots seamlessly into the news feed and is especially notable in what it asks, or doesn’t ask, of its readers. The point is not to get them to click on more stories or to engage further with a brand. The point is to get them to share the post that’s right in front of them. Everything else is secondary.

To Trump, Even Losing Is Winning

Neal Gabler, a favorite, for the New York Times:

People run for the presidency for all sorts of reasons. But Donald J. Trump may be the first to run because he sees a presidential campaign as the best way to attract attention to himself. There seems to be no other driving passion in him, certainly not the passion to govern.

Clearly.

Attention has always been the foundation of Mr. Trump’s modus operandi. Basically, he sells his name: Trump steaks, Trump water, Trump University. You have to hand it to him, though. He discovered that, in a celebrity society like ours, where so many people are competing for attention, running for president puts you a leg up even on the Kardashians.

How do we keep this from happening again?

NBC Sports has a gay problem

This is disappointing.

The network failed to identify Dustin Lance Black in the audience of the men's synchro diving finals as bronze-medalist Tom Daley's fiancé. Not boyfriend, not long-time friend... fiancé. And an Oscar-winning fiancé at that (read: public interest). They are, arguably, the "it" couple of the gay community, yet NBC didn't mention a word.

When NBC broadcast the match of Brazilian volleyball player Larissa França, they followed her to the stands where she embraced her wife. NBC commentator Chris Marlowe's color commentary?

"That is her husband. She married Lili in 2013 and Larissa is celebrating with her pals."

NBC Olympics Ratings Woes

The Opening Ceremonies in Rio delivered the lowest ratings for NBC since 2004, audience down 35% from London opener 4 years ago.

NBC blames this on "changing media viewing habits" - which sounds like they've given up on trying to adapt to changing media viewing habits.

“To expect the same pure television consumption four years removed from London just isn’t logical, but overall consumption is at or above our expectations,” said NBC Sports spokesman Greg Hughes. A comparison to London, he said, is “apples to oranges” given changing media viewing habits.

Innovating inside old media is hard, apparently.

NBC delays olympics "for the women"

NBC, still living in the dystopian old-media past, tries to justify not broadcasting the games live by saying "women."

The people who watch the Olympics are not particularly sports fans. More women watch the Games than men, and for the women, they're less interested in the result and more interested in the journey. It's sort of like the ultimate reality show and mini-series wrapped into one. And to tell the truth, it has been the complaint of a few sports writers. It has not been the complaint of the vast viewing public.

Astounding.