Curvature Continuity

Mark Stanton writes on Apple's corner design:

...you might look at Apple’s icons and think that they’re just a rounded square or a ‘roundrect’. If you’ve been designing icons, you know that they’re something different and may have heard the word squircle used (mathematical intermediate of a square and a circle). And if you’re an Industrial Designer, you recognize this as a core signature of their hardware products.Ever since iOS 7, app icons went from being rounded squares to something more complex and refined. While everyone gets that Apple pays attention to the most minute details, not everyone sees the obvious logic behind this seemingly small change.

stranger things

We're obsessed with this show.

Ars Technica:

After all, this is a story that could happen (and has happened) in any era. A kid has gone missing, some dark forces seem to be at play, and it'll take a village (or at least a team of adults, our D&D nerds, and their siblings) to figure everything out. But what makes Stranger Things stand out after its eight-episode first season is that the show only uses the familiar as a backdrop; it doesn't wallow in it or simply retread known stories. This isn't Ready Player One, new Ghostbusters, or any of the upcoming Star Wars onslaught. Instead, Netflix's lovely homage to 1980s genre fiction deploys nostalgia only to speed up and deepen world-building. Its story, by contrast, feels fresh by including enough twists and turns to keep even the most capable pop-culture detectives guessing and entertained.

Also obsessed with the visual branding for the show, created by Imaginary Forces.

logo as packaging

Domino's pizza boxes have gotten a fantastic refresh in the UK by JKR. They said:

Over the years, Domino’s packaging had become overloaded with generic messaging that had little impact with consumers, and the brand mark had become relegated to a small endorsement on pack. Our task was to make Domino’s the definitive article once more by redesigning its delivery boxes in the UK.

Packaging is so often overlooked as an opportunity to delight and reinforce brand, it's fun to see this happening in a category like the pizza box.

san francisco's building-street interface

Benjamin Grant, writing for Spur, on the downsides of San Francisco's urban fabric. A beautiful city, with a thoughtless approach to public space:

In a typical San Francisco street, both of these transitions [parking lanes and stoops] are absent or compressed. Curb cuts often preclude trees, curbs, and parking, exposing pedestrians to traffic and preventing the definition of a distinct pedestrian space. Buildings often lack a setback, reducing the privacy of residents and the comfort of pedestrians. Stoops and entry stairs are usually articulated inward, creating deep, cave-like spaces with poor security and no social use.

And, as San Francisco has a deeply ingrained relationship with its past, it seems unable to break the pattern.

The thoughtless and precipitous upheavals of mid-century urban renewal have made San Franciscans especially protective of the past. But the historic patterns of this city’s residential neighborhoods don’t offer especially good models for livable streets. And to a surprising extent, these patterns continue to be replicated in new construction as designers, developers and policymakers look to the city’s older neighborhoods as points of reference. Even as architectural styles, building codes, parking requirements and other parameters evolve, the urban fundamentals have remained surprisingly unchanged. It’s as if this pattern is woven into the city’s DNA, as if we are a city congenitally predisposed against good streets.